Bear Has a Story to Tell-this week at Perfect Picture Book Friday

Perfect Picture Book Friday looks at Bear Has a Story to Tell by Philip C. Stead, a story about patience, caring, and friendship.

Do you remember coming home from school, bursting with a story about something amazing that happened to you or to a friend? Maybe you spent the whole day reviewing every detail because you didn’t want to leave out anything your family might find funny or fascinating. Finally, the end-of-the-day bell rings. You make a mad dash for home and burst through the front door. But instead of getting a chance to tell your story, your mother is on the phone, and it looks like she won’t be ending her call with Aunt Sylvie anytime soon. Your Dad is over in the neighbor’s yard, helping to fix a sputtering lawnmower. Your sister is dashing out the front door for her ballet class. The only one left to share your story with is Spot, and he’s in the middle of a tail-wagging, paw-prancing nap.

You wait…

You wait longer…

Dinner comes. The family, including Spot, gather at the table, and you can’t remember enough of your story to make it worth telling anymore. You sum up your day in a few words.

“It was fine.”

If this has ever happened to you, you’ll enjoy today’s picture book review beary, beary much!

Bear Has a Story to Tell

Written by- Philip C. Stead

Illustrated by – Erin E. Stead

Published by- Roaring Book Press – 2012

Topics – patience, caring, and friendship.

Opening – It was almost winter and Bear was getting sleepy. But first, Bear had a story to tell.

“Mouse, would you like to hear a story?” asked Bear with a yawn.

“I am sorry, Bear,” said Mouse, “but it is almost winter and I have many seeds to gather.”

Synopsis from Amazon – Bear found his friend Mouse, but Mouse was busy gathering seeds and didn’t have time to listen to a story. Then Bear saw his friend Duck, but Duck was getting ready to fly south. What about his friend Toad? He was busy looking for a warm place to sleep. By the time Bear was through helping his friends get ready for winter, would anyone still be awake to hear his story?

This endearing story of friendship and patience is a worthy companion to Philip and Erin Stead’s last collaboration, A Sick Day for Amos McGee, winner of the 2011 Caldecott Medal.

Why do I like this book? Many kids (and adults) will easily see themselves in this story and say, “I know what Bear is going through.” and “I know exactly how he feels.” But looking past Bear’s problem of wanting to share a story with his busy friends, Bear’s generous caring nature shines through far brighter as he puts the needs of others before his own. I found so much to love in this tender and touching story, and I hope if you read Bear Has a Story to Tell, you will feel the same way, too.

Learn more about Philip C. Stead HERE.

Learn more about Erin E. Stead HERE.

Until next Friday.

Perfect Picture Book Friday Shares Glamourpuss

Perfect Picture Book Friday looks at, Glamourpuss, by Sarah Weeks.

Having grown up with cats, (cats we assumed were all girls until their fated trip to the vet when we were told we had boys in need of quick name changes…) I couldn’t resist sharing this wonderful book. Although none of my cats worshiped themselves to the degree Glamourpuss does in this charming fairytale-esque story, they all came dangerously close.

Title – Glamourpuss

Written by- Sarah Weeks

Illustrated by- David Small

Published by- Scholastic Press – 2015

Topics – friendship, jealousy, and compassion

Opening – Once upon a pillow sat a glamorous cat named Glamourpuss.

Jacket copy  –Glamourpuss loves being the center of attention. So when an unwelcome guest (a dog, no less!) steals the spotlight with some tasteless bow-wowing and undignified tail-wagging, Glamourpuss worries that she’s going to fall out of fashion.  Is there room for only one superstar in this mansion? When Glamourpuss makes her most majestic move to find out, the result is pure purrfection.

Kirkus Review – A lighthearted twist on the traditional antagonism between cats and dogs takes place in an over-the-top upper-crust world.

Weeks includes several nods to fairy-tale conventions in her slyly amusing text. The saga begins “Once upon a pillow,” and the eponymous heroine turns to her mirror for confirmation that she is the “most glamorous of all.” Meanwhile, classic films are clearly the inspiration for Small. Created with ink, watercolor, pastel, and collage, illustrations include a flat-screen TV showing Theda Bara as Cleopatra, a scrawny Chihuahua with Shirley Temple, Carmen Miranda and Scarlett O’Hara costumes, and a setting that evokes the glamour of old Hollywood. Bluebelle, the dog, is a visitor in the home of Glamourpuss’ owners and, in the cat’s eyes at least, a rival for their affections. Well-pleased with her luxurious lifestyle, cheerfully cataloged in scratchy, energetic artwork, Glamourpuss tries her best to sabotage Bluebelle. While her efforts don’t pan out, and the dog definitely has her day, young listeners will likely be pleased with the (not entirely) unexpected rapprochement between the two pets.

Sophisticated vocabulary and pop-culture references may well fly over the heads of children, making this fizzy, exuberant entertainment a treat that is best shared by an adult with a penchant for screwball comedy. (Picture book. 4-7)

Why do I like this book? The marriage of text and illustration is purrr-fect. The story opens with the introduction of an excessively pampered cat who thinks highly of herself. Children will learn new vocabulary words with ease as they are clearly and humorously defined both through text and illustration.  The illustrations offer a wealth of details to keep young listeners entertained as they endure the frustration Glamourpuss feels when a talented dog in tacky clothes comes to visit. Enter…Bluebell. Upon discovering that Bluebell despises entertaining and parading about in ridiculous outfits, Glamourpuss steps in to offer a few lessons of her own, helping Bluebell become the kind of dog she deserves and wants to be, thus creating a lasting friendship.

Author – Visit Sarah Weeks here.

Illustrator – Visit David Small here. 

Interview with Sarah Weeks about Glamourpuss here.

Learn to draw a cat for children here.

Perfect Picture Book Friday Looks at The Most Magnificent Thing

Perfect Picture Book Friday looks at The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires, a story about never giving up no matter how many failures come.

Back when I was about ten years old, I colored a picture of a field of flowers for my room. I drew some teeny-tiny blooms and some enormous ones. I gave each flower unique petals, shapes, and colors – no two were alike. I worked until I had filled the field with the happiest flowers I could imagine. Then, I ran to show it to my mother, eager for her praise and pretty sure I had earned lots of it for my masterpiece!

Note: My mother was a scientific illustrator at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois.

Does anyone see where this is going? 

Picture me dashing into the kitchen, clutching my drawing, and putting off as much enthusiasm as Charlie Bucket did when he found the golden ticket, wrapped inside a Wonka bar.

My mother smoothed out my drawing and studied it. I watched her eyes sweep over my art as she took in the beauty of each of my carefully executed blossoms and my impressive array of colors.

“Well?” I begged. “What do you think?”

Mom pointed to a yellow flower with spiky petals. “What kind of flower is this one?”

“That’s a daisy,” I said, “and that blue one is a daisy, too. This red one is rose, of course. And that hairy, pink one is a clover. And that orange one is a marigold. Over here, I drew a lilac bush, and in that corner is a tulip. And look,” I said, my enthusiasm nearly pushing the roof off of our house, “I even drew a cactus exactly like the ones we saw in Arizona on vacation last summer!”

“And all these flowers are growing where?” Mom asked.

“In a big field.”

“And where is this big field?” Mom pressed.

“Here,” I said, holding up my picture. “Right here.”

“Well, if that’s so,” Mom said, “this picture could never exist anywhere. In real nature, these plants wouldn’t grow in the same place. If you want to draw an accurate picture of flowers, you can look them up in one of my botany books by region and season.” She handed the picture back to me.

I walked to my room and drew a picture of a flower–one flower. On another sheet of paper, I drew a different kind of flower. By the end of the day, I had drawn lots of flowers. I pinned them next to each other because, in my room, anything I could imagine was possible.

The Most Magnificent Thing

Written and illustrated by- Ashley Spires

Published by- Kids Can Press – 2014

Topics – Determination, imagination, and persistence.

Opening – This is a regular girl and her best friend in the whole wide world. They do all kinds of things together. They race. They eat. They explore. They relax. She makes things. He unmakes things. One day, the girl has a wonderful idea. She is going to make the most MAGNIFICENT thing! 

(Seriously long) Synopsis from Amazon – Award-winning author and illustrator Ashley Spires has created a charming picture book about an unnamed girl and her very best friend, who happens to be a dog. The girl has a wonderful idea. “She is going to make the most MAGNIFICENT thing! She knows just how it will look. She knows just how it will work. All she has to do is make it, and she makes things all the time. Easy-peasy!” But making her magnificent thing is anything but easy, and the girl tries and fails, repeatedly. Eventually, the girl gets really, really mad. She is so mad, in fact, that she quits. But after her dog convinces her to take a walk, she comes back to her project with renewed enthusiasm and manages to get it just right. For the early grades’ exploration of character education, this funny book offers a perfect example of the rewards of perseverance and creativity. The girl’s frustration and anger are vividly depicted in the detailed art, and the story offers good options for dealing honestly with these feelings, while at the same time reassuring children that it’s okay to make mistakes. The clever use of verbs in groups of threes is both fun and functional, offering opportunities for wonderful vocabulary enrichment. The girl doesn’t just “make” her magnificent thing — she “tinkers and hammers and measures,” she “smoothes and wrenches and fiddles,” she “twists and tweaks and fastens.” These precise action words are likely to fire up the imaginations of youngsters eager to create their own inventions and is a great tie-in to learning about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.

Why do I like this book? Kids need to learn not to give up at the first sign of failure, and this story provides the perfect example of how trying, again and again, can lead to success. This story also shows that taking a close look at “why” something failed can lead to better results. The specific areas Ashley Spires chose to color in the illustrations keeps the focus on what is important in each scene. On a scale of 1-10 (10 being the best), I give this book a solid 10!

Learn more about the author/illustrator, Ashley Spires HERE.

A writer’s prompt: Write about a something you made that took many, many, many tries to get right.

Until next Friday.

Perfect Picture Book Friday Looks at Crow Call by Lois Lowry

Perfect Picture Book Friday looks at Crow Call by Lois Lowry.

Near me, where I write, stand two tall bookshelves–an anniversary gift from my understanding husband. I dedicated shelves to picture books, middle-grade novels, nonfiction books for children, and books on the many aspects of writing books.  On my picture book shelf, one book sits with its cover facing me. That book is Crow Call by Lois Lowry.

A couple of years ago, my daughter asked me to bring her to the book fair at her school. Since we had too many bills to pay off that month, I told her I could only afford to buy one or two books for her and none for me.

Who was I fooling…? My addiction to books began as a child when my father covered one wall of our living room, end to end and floor to ceiling, with bookshelves he handmade. Over the years, we filled those shelves to brimming. 

Crow Call by Lois Lowry Illustrated by Bagram Ibatoulline.

In the room set up for the fair, I said to my daughter, “Go ahead and look around. I’ll be over here, browsing the picture books.”

My eyes roamed over the titles and then…a book caught my eye.  Crow Call by Lois Lowry. I immediately identified with the young girl with blonde braids on the cover. She looked like me when I was her age. The girl was standing on a golden hillside, staring up with wonder at a sky filled with crows. The illustration, made with the loving hand of illustrator, Bagram Ibatoulline, perfectly captured the landscape of my childhood. I read the opening lines, continued to the last page of this feel-good story, and swallowed my tears.

Right about the time when I closed the book and held it in a hug that I heard a familiar voice…

“I thought you weren’t going to buy any books for yourself,” my daughter said.

“I love this story so much,” I managed to say. And that’s all I said as I clutched the book harder.

Then, she noted the tears in my eyes and hugged me. “I think you need to buy this one.”

Crow Call

*Written by- Lois Lowry – Drawn from her own personal experience as a child.

*Illustrated by- Bagram Ibatoulline

*Published by- Scholastic Press, 2009

*Suitable for – 4 and up

*Topics/Theme – The bond of parent and child, specifically father and daughter.

*Opening –  It’s morning, early, barely light, cold for November. At home, in the bed next to mine, Jessica, my older sister, still sleeps. But my bed is empty.

Words from the author “The details of Crow Call are true. They happened in 1945 to me and my father. But parents and children groping toward understanding each other — that happens to everyone. And so this story is not really just my story, but everyone’s.” —Lois Lowry

Synopsis from Amazon

This is the story of young Liz, her father, and their strained relationship. Dad has been away at WWII for longer than she can remember, and they begin their journey of reconnection through a hunting shirt, cherry pie, tender conversation, and the crow call. This allegorical story shows how, like the birds gathering above, the relationship between the girl and her father is graced with the chance to fly.

Why do I like this book? So many picture books these days have sparse text and are 500 words or less–often less. But this book, with it longer text, tells a rich and satisfying story of a relationship between a father and daughter separated by a war. It captures the shyness of a little girl who sees her father as a stranger. Their journey into the day becomes an important step in finding their way back–together. Through the father’s generosity, sensitivity, and gentleness, a bond is formed which leads to a perfectly satisfying ending. Now, team up the beautiful writing of Lois Lowry with the soft, realistic illustrations of Bagram Ibatoulline, and you have a Newberry Medal winner in your hands.

Lois Lowry’s website (author)

Classroom author study of Lois Lowry

Bagram Ibatoulline’s website (illustrator)

To listen to Lois Lowry speak about Crow Call, visit YouTube.

A writer’s prompt: Write about a special time you shared with your mom or dad when you were a child–a time that strengthened your parent-child bond.

Until next Friday.

Why I Write For Children.

Yesterday, while I browsed through posts on my blog from 2015, I reread one I titled, Why I Write For Children. Three years have passed, and my reasons are still true today. Here is that post.

Earlier today, I visited a blog that invited writers to answer why they write for children. To answer the question, I only had to look at my daughter.

illustration by Leslie Leibhardt Goodman

From the time my little girl turned two, she rarely wanted me to read to her at bedtime. Instead, she asked me to tell a story I made up. She’d scrunch up the blankets in her hands, roll back her eyes, think of a character, a situation, and say, “Tell me a story about a princess with the sniffles. Ready? Set? Go! 

I had zero seconds to brainstorm a possible plot. No, not every story was good, and frankly, some lousy, but still, my daughter liked bedtime because of this game. I loved her widening eyes, her impish smile, and her wild applause when I finished.

I write for children because their world inspires me. My world, the world adults live in, is a serious, rule-filled world stuffed with responsibilities. Children openly love silliness. They accept the improbable and impossible. They thrive on magical and believe in happily ever after.

I write for children because the three-headed monster hanging out under their bed is as real to them as the bills on my desk are to me.

When I write for children, I think back to my childhood when my sister and I explored the forest around our house. A fallen tree became a ship we co-captained. Squirrels scurrying under leaves were distant pirates. A bird perched high in the branches was our lookout. Through the eyes of our parents, we were playing on a dead tree, risking infection from a splinter or a bite from a spider. Strange how they could never see the tree for more than it was.

I write for children because it’s what I love.

How To Write Better Story Details

Instead of a picture book review this Friday, I’ve chosen to share a favorite writing exercise I read about in an art book a while back. The instructions were straightforward: using a pencil or pen, fill the bottom of your page with a drawing of grass. It sounded simple enough. I sketched a row of haphazard, waving, wandering wisps across the bottom of my paper, thinking I’d captured grass-ness.

young grain

Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

Next, the instructions said to head outdoors and bring in a clump of grass, study it, and draw grass again. I dug a one-inch patch out of the corner of the lawn where I hoped it wouldn’t be noticed. Back inside at my desk, I brought out my magnifying glass and studied each blade. Clearly, I had missed some details in my earlier drawing. The blades of grass grew thin at the top where they reached a point and thicker in the middle. One of the blades had been nibbled by a hungry insect, leaving a tattered line along one edge. Another blade had a crease from being stepped upon. And at the base, where the roots disappeared into the earth, the deep green had faded away.

As a writer, I found this drawing exercise relevant. How often have I placed a story in a setting where I have never spent a minute or in a place I knew as a child but haven’t visited since? While I’m writing, I think I’m recalling the details of sight, sound, touch, and taste accurately. However, my descriptions, as it turns out, might be simplified, like my first drawing before I brought in the grass I dug from my lawn. So, what did I learn?

Set aside time to visit the location I’ve chosen for my story.

Take pictures from low on the ground and up high (if possible) for a bird’s-eye view.

Photograph as many details as possible.

Pull out my notebook and pen and jot down sensory details.

Make sketches of anything that interests me.

Video record with my cell phone so I can listen to and observe this place while I’m writing.

And, if visiting the location isn’t possible, do an internet search. Look up videos of the ocean, videos taken in space (if your picture book has a planetary setting), videos of farm life, etc… Google maps is also a great place to check out towns and cities on our globe you want the characters in your manuscript to interact with.

Let’s pretend my story is about two children who visit their grandparents near the sea. Let’s also pretend I live close enough to a beach to spend the day there.

I step onto the sand and take off my shoes. In my notebook, I write down the details about this moment.

The golden color of the sand, the warm temperature against my feet, the gritty, abrasive feel of crushed shells and sand beneath my feet.

I step into the ocean and notice…

The many colors of the blue and gray sky reflected on the surface, the foamy edges of the tide washing over the beach, a smooth seashell pushed up on the shore, the force of the waves washing against my legs, the roar of the waves, the cry of the seagulls, and the salty smell perfumed with a touch of fishiness… 

Before I leave the sea, I photograph the water pulling around a shell on the sand, a wave building in the distance, and the entire shoreline. I add a few more drawings into my sketchbook of a crab scraping over a stone in its path. Then, I fill a small container with sand and collect a few seashells to bring home along with the memories I have gathered.

I’m ready to write.

Until next Friday.

Perfect Picture Book Friday is Going Places!

When I was a child, my father brought home a box of Legos. The set held a handful of teeny-tiny plastic bricks, medium bricks, and others that were long, fat, and flat. The instruction booklet showed pictures for possible things the set could build. My sister made a tall, thin house with a steep roof. I built a short house with a flat roof. My Dad built a little plane. After we played with the toys we made, we snapped apart the bricks and saw what else we could build, using only our imaginations to guide us.

Flash forward: I’m married and have a daughter who has received an amazing Lego ship set for her seventh birthday. Her smile is bigger than a crescent moon. She lays out the instructions and stacks the Lego pieces into organized piles. For the next two hours, she builds that ship and sets it adrift in the middle of our coffee table. With a stern face, she instructs her dad and me NOT to touch it, NOT to play with it, and NOT to use the coffee table as she has repurposed it into a museum-grade, display table for her masterpiece.

YEARS have passed. The ship eventually sailed down to the basement where it is resting in drydock with other forgotten toys because…

there was nothing else the instructions said the Lego set could build but a ship.

Taking what we are given and seeing what other possibilities exist is the theme for today’s Perfect Picture Book Friday review.

Title – Going Places – view on Amazon HERE.

Written by – Peter and Paul Reynolds

Illustrated by – Peter Reynolds

Published by – Scholastic Inc. – 2014

Suitable for ages – 3-7

Topics/Theme –  Thinking outside the box (literally).

Opening – Rafael had been waiting all year long for the Going Places contest, a chance to build a go-cart, race it…and win.

When their teacher announced, “Who would like the first kit?” Rafael’s hand shot up.

Why do I like this book? Going Places shows us that some people will see the picture on a kit and follow the instructions EXACTLY, while other kids will say, “That’s nice, but what else can I build?” Peter and Paul Reynolds have created a brilliant story that inspires and encourages everyone, no matter their age, to look waaay outside the box and fly!

Learn more about Peter and Paul Reynolds HERE.

Until next Friday!

Perfect Picture Book Friday gets close to nature.

Growing up in the country, nature surrounded me. Nature nested in sturdy branches, burrowed holes in my mother’s garden, nibbled juicy mulberries in the woods, made a cozy home beneath rotted logs, and glistened after a summer rain. Nature also found its way into our house where it climbed up the windows (thousands of ladybugs), thought it was okay to share my pillow (a long, hairy millipede), and nestled on the windowsill to dry its wings after hatching in my bedroom (a luna moth).

When I was about ten, I spotted a wasp nest under construction above our front door. Instead of swatting it down with the kitchen broom, my mother introduced nature to me as the precious gift it is. She brought out a pair of garden chairs from the garage and set them up within five feet of the wasps. That afternoon, we watched the winged architects increase the size of their home while we sipped iced tea and enjoyed the amazing show.

Watching nature is at the heart of today’s Perfect Picture Book Friday review.

Title – On Bird Hill – view on Amazon HERE.

Written by – Jane Yolen

Illustrated by – Bob Marstall

Published by – The Cornell Lab Publishing Group – 2016

Suitable for ages – 3-7

Topics/Theme –  observation, nature, birds,

Opening –

As I was walking on Bird Hill,

Though it was day, the moon shone still.

And on Bird Hill, I saw a tree,

As light and bright as it could be.

Why do I like this book? This rhyming picture book is written and illustrated in an amazing way. The reader begins with a broad view of nature. Then, page after page we are made aware that something wonderful is about to happen as we are moved in closer and closer to the big moment (which I will not spoil for you).

Learn more about Jane Yolen HERE.

Learn more about Bob Marstall HERE.

Until next Friday!

The Search Is On For Buried Treasure This Perfect Picture Book Friday!

When my sister and I were kids, we spent a number of sunny afternoons building outdoor rooms from twigs, rocks, and string in the forest. We imagined the spaces we had marked off were our neighboring homes. Sometimes, we sat on the backs of fallen trees, pretending to be sea captains of an imaginary sailing vessel. Once in a while, with fingers and twigs, we dug in the earth, hoping to find a small treasure.

In today’s Perfect Picture Book Friday review, two boys do more than dig a little hole in their search for buried treasure…

Title – Sam & Dave Dig A Hole – view on Amazon HERE.

Written by – Mac Barnett

Illustrated by – Jon Klassen

Published by – Candlewick Press – 2014

Suitable for ages – 3-7

Topics/Theme –  Searching for treasure, determination, acceptance

Opening –

On Monday Sam and Dave dug a hole.

“When should we stop digging?” asked Sam.

“We are on a mission,” said Dave. “We won’t stop digging until we find something spectacular.”

Why do I like this book? This is one of those amazing stories in which the marriage between text and illustration become pure magic! Page after page, we wait for Sam and Dave to find the treasure they so desperately seek. And through the illustrations, we stay one agonizing step ahead of the determined treasure-seekers, stressing beyond belief! I’m not going to spoil the imaginative fun this story provides. I’ll only say that this book is a treasure worth seeking.

Learn more about Mac Barnett HERE.

Learn more about Jon Klassen HERE.

JUST FOR FUN! Hide tiny treasures and trinkets in a large, sand-filled, storage container in your backyard. Next, make a treasure map that leads kids to the treasure. Give them small plastic shovels and let them pretend to be Sam and/or Dave from today’s picture book story.

Until next Friday!

Perfect Picture Book Friday Fills Your Mouth With Ps (not peas).

When was the last time you had a mouthful of Ps? Yup, Ps not peas. Maybe this question has you thinking back to your childhood when you checked out a book of tongue twisters from your library that drove your tongue crazy. Remember Peter Piper who picked a peck of pickled peppers? And how about…

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck would chuck wood? He would chuck, he would, as much as he could and chuck as much wood as a woodchuck would if a woodchuck could chuck wood.

Did you know that tongue twisters are used for articulation exercises by public speakers such as actors and television hosts?

Keep in mind that it isn’t how quickly you can say the tongue twister that counts, but how clearly you can enunciate the words.

Although today’s picture book isn’t written as a traditional tongue twister, the sheer number of words starting and containing Ps, makes it feel like one. So, without further ado, here is the mouthful of Ps I mentioned earlier–Princess Prunella and the Purple Peanut, a picture book packed with page after page of perfectly peachy, pleasing P words paired with other particularly pleasant-to-say P words.

Title – Princess Prunella and the Purple Peanut – view on Amazon HERE.

Written by – Margaret Atwood

Illustrated by – Maryann Kovalski

Published by – Workman Publishing – 1995

Suitable for ages – 3-7

Topics/Theme –  Prideful snobbery, tolerance, acceptance

Opening –Princess Prunella lived in a pink palace with her pinheaded parents, Princess Patty and Prince Peter, her three plump pussycats, Patience, Prue and Pringle, and her puppy dog, Pug.

Like I said earlier, this book provides a mouthful of Ps. (There are 68 P’s on the next page alone!) 

Why do I like this book? When I first checked out this book, about five years ago, my daughter and I tried to see how tongue-tied we could get by reading this story as fast as possible. Try it, I can pretty much promise you a powerfully pleasing plethora of plentiful laughter. Having said that, reading a book in which the author has hand-selected as many P words as possible, makes for a positive reading experience. And the pretty illustrations are particularly pleasing, too!

Just for fun, try writing a tongue twister.

Choose a letter that you like the sound of.

Create a character whose first and last names start with that letter.

Make a list of nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives that start with that letter.

Try switching up the vowel sounds that follow the first letter like:

Peter picked a patch of pulpy potatoes.

Or… Find words with similar sounding vowel sounds like:

Carla carted cartons of carrots in her car.  

See if you can come up with a fun-to-say tongue twister.

Here’s the one I came up with.

Douglas Diffy daintily danced with his daffy dalmatian in his dusty dining room. 

Until next Friday!